Ecological Archives E095-116-A2

Stower C. Beals, Laurel M. Hartley, Janet S. Prevéy, Timothy R. Seastedt. 2014. The effects of black-tailed prairie dogs on plant communities within a complex urban landscape: An ecological surprise?. Ecology 95:1349–1359. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/13-0984.1

Appendix B. Supplementary results: species level comparisons and the effects of occupation duration on the cover of vegetation functional groups.

Table B1. The top four species that increased and decreased in the presence of prairie dogs. All changes in cover after occupation were signficant (p < 0.05). The group designation of “F” and “G” refer to forb and grass, respectively. The origin classifcation of “N” and “I” refer to native and introduced, respectively.

 Increased Cover

Species

Mean % cover occupied ± SE (n = 122)

Mean % cover unoccupied ± SE (n = 312)

Group

Origin

Convolvulus arvensis

16.38 ± 1.79

1.38 ± 0.20

F

I

Erodium cicutarium

2.73 ± 0.65

0.09 ± 0.03

F

I

Plantago patagonica

1.80 ± 0.47

0.04 ± 0.02

F

N

Phyla cuneifolia

1.05 ± 0.51

0.02 ± 0.01

F

N

 Decreased Cover

Species

Mean % cover occupied ± SE (n = 122)

Mean % cover unoccupied ± SE (n = 312)

Group

Origin

Andropogon gerardii

0.50 ± 0.14

3.47 ± 0.37

G

N

Bromus japonicus

0.40 ± 0.19

2.53 ± 0.34

G

I

Poa agassizensis

0.09 ± 0.04

1.93 ± 0.29

G

N

Alyssum parviflorum

0.07 ± 0.04

1.81 ± 0.24

F

I

 

FigB1

Fig. B1. The change in percent cover bare ground, native forbs, introduced forbs, native grasses and introduced grasses following prairie dog occupation (n varies from 2 to 12 for years inhabited). Both native and introduced grasses showed immediate cover declines following prairie dog occupation, although the native grasses showed a slight rebound after seven years of occupation (Fig. 6). The cover of both native and introduced forbs increased at similar rates over eight years of occupation, despite annual variability. Introduced forb cover increased immediately following prairie dog occupation at a rate greater than all other classes.


[Back to E095-116]